Chief executive David McNally admitted yesterday that criticism of Norwich City’s decision to increase season ticket prices for next season was reasonable.

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The Canaries unveiled their 2013-14 season framework on Wednesday afternoon, which delivered an above-inflation rise in the cost of a seat.

The amount of that increase for each fan depends on whether they opt out of a £1 donation for each scheduled home game that goes to City’s academy set-up – while City securing Premier League status for a third season would guarantee a price freeze in 2014-15 for those signing up early this time around.

But with the economic environment proving a burden for most, McNally understands the displeasure of some at having to pay more for the privilege of watching Norwich at a regularly sold out Carrow Road.

“I think because we have such a broad support base and we have supporters who are quite rightly very quick to comment on anything that the club does, I’m not surprised at all there has been a huge response,” said McNally. “Certainly most of the comments through to me, most people are broadly supportive.

“There has been some constructive criticism about any kind of increase in these most difficult of economic conditions, so there has been some constructive criticism.

“I think there has also been a need for clarification on the academy donation, which is entirely optional and if people don’t want to donate the £1 then they don’t have to. It means a Barclay ticket is not £518 but £499, and the average drops from £27 per game to £26, which is why the accepted increase is 6pc.

“But in some respects we accept there would be criticism with any increase. We understand that when people’s salaries are not going up by anything like that, we would be in for some criticism. So we accept that and that is entirely reasonable.

“But equally we are run like a cooperative and any spare cash goes back into football, and that is what we want to do – ensure we’re not producing tens of millions of pounds of profits like any normal businesses would, but we aren’t reinvesting any spare cash into the playing product.”

The Canaries’ are not the only club left to deal with complaints over ticket prices. Arsenal fans have made their feelings clear after regular hikes in their season ticket prices, while Manchester City fans were left bitter at paying £62 to watch their side win at The Emirates on Sunday.

“Arsenal have had to deal with some questions about their pricing policy, but they are a bit like us in terms of the way we are positioned in that they do not have a hugely wealthy benefactor putting extra cash into their football club,” added McNally.

“So they have to self-generate (income). I think ticket pricing will continue to be a matter for us all to be aware of but we are not pricing games at levels that we don’t think are affordable. Compared to other forms of entertainment, £27 for an adult at Carrow Road is great value for money.”

15 comments

  • Just a suggestion but why not ask the lower league clubs to make a donation to the Norwich academy? They are the teams who benefit as Norwich don't have the courage to play their academy scholars anymore.

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    waclor

    Friday, January 18, 2013

  • Also, I suppose the Academy donation thing has just a touch of emotional blackmail about it, though I`m sure it was not intended that way. I`m sure the club is generating enough cash now to support our much-vaunted Academy. Next season more so, if we stay in the Premiership and as long as we can avoid throwing silly money at transfer fees and players` salaries. Difficult to avoid - everybody else seems to do it. It`s not a bad gravy train to be on, is it?

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    Mad Brewer

    Friday, January 18, 2013

  • The rises are better than I feared. But my grumble is about the donation. It should have been an opt in rather than an opt out. I would imagine the club was relying on people not to notice or can't be bothered to email or telephone to opt out... That to me is a little off the mark, given the support and the way many rallied when the club needed money the most.

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    gordon52

    Friday, January 18, 2013

  • The problem is rich overseas owners pumping millions into clubs, buying the best players and offering them staggeringly ridiculous amounts of money per week that other clubs are struggling to keep up. We have to pay more so that our club can stay in the premier league where we want them to be. Fifa & Uefa need to do more than this spending beyond your means rule, maybe they should bring in wage caps of £50000 per week (even that still seems high). If clubs didnt have to pay players so much, then maybe the supporters could enjoy cheaper football with players who want to play the sport they love rather than working for the millions they earn a year. Really annoys me that fans hard earned money goes into players pockets like Suarez.

    Report this comment

    Piranha24

    Friday, January 18, 2013

  • Nearly everybody at City games is over 65.Cheap seats or under 21 cheap seats. Adolescents and no atmosphere.Middle guy squeezed out again.

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    PaulH

    Friday, January 18, 2013

  • Interesting fact PaulH, about as accurate as me saying that 90% of the under 21s are Irish, begorrah.

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    DocOhNo

    Friday, January 18, 2013

  • The trouble seems to be that "footy", as the working mans` sport outlet has been taken over by the would be Burberry Blobs. And those funded by the DSS or Corpulent Entertainment.

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    Mad Brewer

    Friday, January 18, 2013

  • busterkarl - if you can't understand the constructive criticism (it's not 'moaning'), then you're completely out of touch with reality. Season ticket costs have basically doubled in the space of a few seasons, and matchday prices are now seriously out of hand for the A and A+ matches. People don't have an unlimited pot of cash to dip into, however loyal they are. As bagulo points out, his wages have been frozen for three years, while the cost of food, fuel and pretty much everything else have soared. Sure, you can adopt an "I'm alright Jack" attitude if you like, but you're ignoring the fact that year-on-year rises of around 10 per cent hurt the average loyal fan. The club is about to receive the biggest TV cash windfall ever (fingers crossed), and they sting fans with this. It's harsh, and unnecessary.

    Report this comment

    Kristan Reed

    Friday, January 18, 2013

  • gordon52.i agree with everything you say.

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    bluelight

    Friday, January 18, 2013

  • Slighly harsh busterkarl don't you think? Some people have their season ticket as the only luxury in their life. They don't want to give it up but it's becoming more and more of a struggle to keep it when the price goes up by more than their wages. As a soldier my wages have been frozen for the last 3 years! How much has my season ticket gone up by in that time? Granted we have moved through the leagues but that doesn't make it more affordable! The fuel to get there has gone up massively too in that time!

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    baguio

    Friday, January 18, 2013

  • why all the moaning. if you dont want to pay the increase then dont. cancel your season ticket. there are over 2000 people waiting to get 1 so pass it on to someone who will pay it. i for 1 will be renewing all 4 of our season tickets.

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    busterkarl

    Friday, January 18, 2013

  • Piranha, I doubt if you'll find many that don't agree that footballers are grossly overpaid but the problem is not one for UEFA or FIFA to control. That is totally out of their hands due to EU regulations. Unfortunately common sense does not play a part in their approach of views of the common man. The cash donation to Premiership teams from TV rights is itself, obscene, and will only increase transfer fees and wage demands. As I'm not a season ticket holder, it's unfair of me to commit my personal view to that debate.

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    Bootneck R.M.

    Saturday, January 19, 2013

  • Busterkarl - Why should the 1000's of season ticket holders who were with the club in League one now cancel their season tickets for the many glory hunters (not all) on the waiting list. There are a lot of pensioners (not me) who have been supporting the club for probably 30-40 years. it's sad if these loyal supporters can't now afford to go. The club should stick with it's loyal fans.

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    Chilly62

    Friday, January 18, 2013

  • So you have a blank cheque Busterkarl.....At no point will you say ''Hey thats a bit much''

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    Richard Bonham

    Friday, January 18, 2013

  • It's not just NCFC - Guardian have an article today on this issue http:www.guardian.co.ukfootball2013jan17high-ticket-prices-premier-league The key is not to price out a whole generation of fans. I noted from the Q&A the issue of young fans students was not addressed. There is a real risk that we will lose those currently struggling to get on the job ladder at the moment. Perhaps that's why the atmosphere at CArrow Rd is reportedly lacking this season?

    Report this comment

    shefcanary

    Friday, January 18, 2013

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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