Norwich City boss Chris Hughton believes the scrap to cash in on the Premier League’s multi-billion pound new television rights deal will not make his task any easier this season.

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The Canaries’ prize for survival is a share of the estimated £3bn windfall from the league’s fresh three-year domestic contract which starts in 2013. City earned £45.6m in broadcast payments from their first campaign back in the Premier League, but under the latest inflated deal even the club who finishes bottom of the table is set to earn more in broadcast revenue than champions Manchester City banked for winning the title – £60.6m.

Sky and BT won the rights for the new packages after a fierce bidding war that saw the Premier League secure a £1.25bn increase on their existing deal which expires at the end of this season. Hughton is well aware of the huge sums at stake, but the Norwich manager insists the finances will take care of themselves if his squad do the business on the pitch.

“The facts with the television money are there for everyone to see, which is why the Championship will be such a competitive league this year,” he said. “It is why the three clubs who went down will also do everything they can to come back up straight away. The finances next season are there for all to see.

“It is just one added pressure to take on board. The biggest pressure is what you put on yourself. This is a club which has worked hard to stay in the Premier League and the pressure is to ensure you keep the team here. It has had a wonderful last three years after a difficult period. There was no doubt it was a good place to be when I came here in the summer. It felt very much like a club on the up when I joined.

“We just have to make sure we do the hard work to maintain that now.”

Hughton, speaking to Talksport, is keen for City to build on an encouraging upturn in form after the latest 1-0 Premier League win over Stoke.

“We’re on a good run at the moment. It was a really good win. When you see them at close quarters and look at the quality they have in the team they are a very stable Premier League side,” he said. “In that last period with a side like Stoke you know what they are trying to do. It is difficult to stop it. The delivery can come from the goalkeeper, from the centre halves. You just have to be in the right places at the right time.

“The games come thick and fast. The thing is we know where we are. Every game is a big game, a tough game. To get something we have to playing at the level of performance that certainly we have done of late. Sometimes what happens when you get a poor performance, and we had a couple when we conceded four and five, there has to be a conscious decision to do something, but it is about trying to get that balance and also having that ability to get some goals.”

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