Hollman lifts lid on on City exit

PUBLISHED: 08:00 28 February 2008 | UPDATED: 15:25 10 September 2010

Chris Lakey

Goalkeeping coach Jim Hollman has talked publicly for the first time about his departure from Norwich City - and insists he left Carrow Road on good terms.

Goalkeeping coach Jim Hollman has talked publicly for the first time about his departure from Norwich City - and insists he left Carrow Road on good terms.

Hollman's sudden exit just before Christmas was shrouded in mystery, with the club releasing only scant details and the reasons behind it never fully made clear.

But Hollman broke his silence yesterday and insisted it was exactly as it said: by mutual consent.

“There is no mystery whatsoever,” said the 29-year-old. “It has always been on my list of things to do, to go to the press and explain it because without an explanation it is disrespectful to the fans. When there is this doubt it breeds lots of speculation.

“It really was mutual consent in the end. I think something told me it was time for a change and we basically decided to go our separate ways. It is a parting of the ways because I'd done enough.”

Hollman spent seven seasons at Carrow Road, during which time he helped nurture the likes of Robert Green as well as current Canaries number one David Marshall.

“I had a fantastic time there,” he said. “I have some very fond memories - the play-offs and then promotion - and the fans are fantastic.

“Glenn's record speaks for itself. He is doing a fantastic job with the squad he has got - players that were there already and the one she brought in. He will take that group where it should be, with no shadow of a doubt. He came in and set out his stall early and the players have responded.

“You can only judge someone by results. In years to come people won't remember the teams or the squad, they will remember the results and how successful the team was.

Hollman left behind a strong lineage of goalkeepers, from England youth internationals Jed Steer and Declan Rudd, through to Academy product Steven Arnold, reserve keeper Matthew Gilks and number one Marshall.

“It's a fantastic group of goalkeepers to have,” he said. “Myself and Darren Lovell, who works in the goalkeeping department

and Football in the Community, set out our guidelines for scouts in terms of recruitment and coaching. A lot of goalkeeping coaches I was in touch with moaned about the lack of talent coming through, but we did something about it and it paid off.”

Hollman, whose career began at Ipswich before he moved into coaching, has been involved in talks with other league clubs and expects to make a return to the professional game in the new season.

“There is something that may crop up before then but that's where I'm setting my sights,” added Hollman, currently doing some work with Danny Potter at Cambridge United. “There are three clubs potentially, of a similar or better standard than Norwich.

“I want to make sure I get the right club and I really don't feel I am in a position that means I have to jump at the first opportunity that comes my way.

“I will just wait for the right club, one that matches my ambitions.”

In the meantime, in between moving to a new home north of Colchester, Hollman has started his own goalkeeping web site.

“I have always been aware that the life expectancy of a goalkeeping coach or any football staff for that matter is limited and you are always going to need other incomes, so that is what it will be,” he said.

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