Lifelong fan who stood up to Canaries

PUBLISHED: 12:17 24 January 2006 | UPDATED: 09:09 14 September 2010

Sid Sadd in a photograph taken in about 1990 at Norwich City Football ground at Carrow Road.

Sid Sadd in a photograph taken in about 1990 at Norwich City Football ground at Carrow Road.

One of Norwich City's oldest and most familiar supporters has died aged 95.

Sid Sadd, who campaigned to save Carrow Road's standing terraces in the early 90s, died peacefully in his sleep on Sunday.

One of Norwich City's oldest and most familiar supporters has died aged 95.

Sid Sadd, who campaigned to save Carrow Road's standing terraces in the early 90s, died peacefully in his sleep on Sunday.

The great grandfather, who was also a keen historian, worked in Norwich's once-renowned shoe manufacturing industry for his whole life.

His only daughter June Head, 58, who now lives in Watton, said: "His heart was always in Norwich.

"He followed them since 1920, his supporting days went back to the days of the Nest.

"If anyone wanted to know anything about local history they would ask him."

Mr Sadd was born in Oak Street, Norwich, in 1910. He attended Quayside School in the city until the age of 14.

After his school days he moved into the shoe trade in Norwich, ending his career at the Norvic shoe factory after 22 years service.

He undertook a six-year stint in the army, including conflict on the Belgium front during the Second World War.

It was during the war that Mr Sadd met his wife Doreen, 83, who survives him. The pair married in August 1945.

Mr Sadd, a long time season-ticket holder in the River End, became a familiar face at Carrow Road in the early 90s when he battled with former chairman Robert Chase to try and save standing areas at the ground.

When the club finally decided to do away with terraces Mr Sadd said he would not return - but his love for the Canaries proved too strong.

Mrs Head added: "When they scrapped the stands he didn't go to the next game, but listening to the game on the radio at home did him in.

"We had to trick him into going back for the next game, but we knew he couldn't stand missing the matches."

She said her father also campaigned strongly for better facilities for disabled fans at Carrow Road.

Roy Blower, of Norwich City Independent Supporters' Association, who presented Mr Sadd with a trophy for his long-standing support for the Canaries, said: "He was a very passionate supporter of the club, and put money into it over time.

"He was a very principled man who stood up for what he believed in."

Mr Sadd wrote three history books, one relating to Norwich in general, another about Oak Street, and one relating to the city's old-time school days.

He grew up in Oak Street, but lived with his family in Rogers Close, West Earlham, for more than 50 years.

He died at St Nicholas Nursing Home in Dereham, where his wife also lives.

Mr Sadd's funeral will be held at Earlham Crematorium on Friday, February 3, at 2.15pm. All are welcome.

Do you want the Evening News to pay tribute to a popular Norfolk character? Telephone reporter Lewis Hannam on (01603) 772426 or e-mail lewis.hannam@archant.co.uk

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