A trip to see my second team

PUBLISHED: 13:01 07 April 2007 | UPDATED: 10:13 14 September 2010

Everyone has a second team, well almost everyone. The team whose result you always look for first. A quick survey of those who sit around me in our office revealed that Chelsea fan Phil's second team is Gillingham.

Everyone has a second team, well almost everyone. The team whose result you always look for first. A quick survey of those who sit around me in our office revealed that Chelsea fan Phil's second team is Gillingham. Brian and Bob, who are both West Ham season ticket holders, named Rangers and Orient as their second teams; Brian as his father was from the blue side of Glasgow, and Bob, as an old friend's father was a photographer at Brisbane Road years ago.

Interestingly though, they all said that Norwich were one of the teams that nearly made it as their second team, though I think that is probably down to the constant diet of Norwich stories and gossip that they are force fed on a daily basis.

My Dad is responsible for my support of Norwich, and he is also responsible for my second team having taken me to see them play in the early seventies.

My second team, Wealdstone, do not even play league football, though if they had won the non-league double of the FA Trophy and the Gola League a couple of years later than the 1984/85 season, they might well have gained promotion to the football league. Their most famous old-boys include Vinnie Jones and Stuart Pearce, and in the early seventies, I remember seeing Terry Dyson, who scored Spurs second goal in the 1961 FA Cup Final, playing at Lower Mead, the ground where Wealdstone used to play. On the site of the old ground now stands a Tescos. I don't go in there out of principle

So when the Wealdstone versus Kings Lynn fixture was re-arranged for the third time this season to April 5, it seemed too good an opportunity to miss to see how Wealdstone and a few ex-Norwich players were getting on.

Of the players that had featured for Norwich, Kings Lynn had just signed Scott Howie, who played a few reserve games for Norwich in the 1993/94 season. He was to play a significant part in the game with a string of good saves in the second half. Lewis Blois, whose was nearest to the first team when he earned a place on the bench in the “Zola” FA Cup replay in which we lost 4-0 was given a real run around by the pacy Wealdstone winger and looked far from the promising academy prospect he was a few years ago. Danny Bloomfield, who left Norwich at the same time as Blois, came on a second half substitute to little effect. Of the other players I was hoping to see, Andrew Fisk did not play, nor did Greg Crane, and Alex Notman had just signed for Histon. The final Norwich connection was Keith Webb who was the Norwich Reserve Team Manager a few months ago.

The pace of the game was frantic, with the dry bobbly pitch not helping. Wealdstone were much the better team, but went behind after a penalty save rebounded back to Nolan who scored with ease. The second half was all Wealdstone, who equalised after a long throw was not cleared. It was not an exaggeration to say it was one of the better games I have seen this season, well refereed and played in front of vocal crowd of around 250.

The game finished 1-1, a result did neither team any favours as they strived for points at differing ends of the table, and given the performance of both teams, I would be surprised if I don't get a chance to see the same fixture next season,

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