Angus and Bryan Gunn set to join Norwich City’s elite father and son club

Bryan Gunn with son Angus in August 2000, aged four, at the opening of the Gunn Club at Carrow Road.

Bryan Gunn with son Angus in August 2000, aged four, at the opening of the Gunn Club at Carrow Road. Picture: Keith Whitmore - Credit: Eastern Counties Newspapers

Angus and Bryan Gunn are poised to become the sixth father and son pairing to represent Norwich City.

Phil Lythgoe followed in his father's footsteps in playing for Norwich City. Picture: Archant Librar

Phil Lythgoe followed in his father's footsteps in playing for Norwich City. Picture: Archant Library - Credit: Archant

The season-long deal bringing Angus back to Norfolk on loan from Manchester City leaves the Norwich-born goalkeeper poised to follow in the footsteps of his father.

Bryan made 477 appearances for the Canaries between 1986 and 1998 to make sure of his place in the club’s Hall of Fame with memorable performances at the top level.

More: A proud moment Bryan Gunn always hoped would happen – but Angus Gunn knows full well he will have to earn Norwich City’s number one shirtWhen the 21-year-old makes his City debut, the Gunn family will become part of an elite club.

The first father and son pairing were Isaac and Terry Ryder, who played for City in the first half of the 20th century.

Former Celtic and Norwich City striker Chris Sutton has hit back at Craig Bellamy's comments. Pictu

Former Celtic and Norwich City striker Chris Sutton has hit back at Craig Bellamy's comments. Picture: Archant Library - Credit: Archant

Isaac was a local centre-forward who made just three appearances in 1925 after scoring regularly for Heigham YMCA, City Wanderers and the Norfolk county side, despite being a regular scorer for City’s reserves.


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Terry followed in his father’s footsteps between 1946 and 1950 but was more successful, scoring 12 goals in 51 games as an outside right. He went on to also play for Portsmouth and scored three goals against Norwich for Swindon during the 1952-53 season.

More: Angus Gunn is ready to do the family name proud at Norwich City when he prepares to turn out for his boyhood club and aims for Championship promotion next seasonAnother example is Mike and Nigel Cassidy, although both only briefly played for the Canaries.

Mike played just once, having done well for the reserves and for Gorleston and Lowestoft locally, in a 0-0 draw with Middlesbrough in the Norfolk & Norwich Hospital Cup in May 1937.

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His son, Nigel, followed suit with three appearances in 1968. The striker scored 112 goals for Lowestoft and 24 in his first season for City’s reserves but failed to make the first team breakthrough. Went on to perform well for Scunthorpe, Oxford and Cambridge in the Football League.

Derrick Lythgoe scored 29 goals in 74 games for the Canaries between 1958 and 1962 before his son, Phil, made 12 appearances and scored once between January 1978 and December 1979.

More: “Very happy we have a Gunn in goal again” – Norwich City fans react to loan signing of Angus Gunn from Manchester CityWhile the pairing of Mike and Chris Sutton are probably the best known father and son to have played for Norwich.

Mike was a utility player who made 54 appearances between 1963 and 1966 before joining Chester as a 22-year-old. Chris needs little introduction after his 43 goals in 126 matches earned him a British record £5million transfer to Blackburn in 1994.

There was an addition earlier this year as well, when Ray Grant came on as a late substitute in the FA Cup defeat at Southampton, following on from his dad, Peter, who made 75 appearances as a midfielder for City between August 1997 and March 1999.

Now the Gunns can join that list as the fifth father and son duo, with Bryan’s ill-fated short stint as manager also joining a separate list of players whose fathers have managed the club.

That includes Kevin Bond playing while his father, John, was manager during the 1970s and Kenny Brown playing when his dad, Ken, was in charge during the 1980s.

• Follow David Freezer on Twitter @davefreezer or on Facebook @DavidFreezer1

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