Don't panic yet . . .

John Wilkinson, NCISA This is no time for panic, but we all need to be realistic and face the facts. These are the words which were going to start my article when I was putting my thoughts together on Tuesday afternoon.

John Wilkinson, NCISA

This is no time for panic, but we all need to be realistic and face the facts. These are the words which were going to start my article when I was putting my thoughts together on Tuesday afternoon.

Then we go out and thrash Wolves 5-2 on Tuesday evening. Moods can change very rapidly in football.

However, the point I wished to make about panic still stands. Panic helps nobody be it fans of the Canaries or those at the club involved in playing, coaching or the overall running of the club.


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Panic brings with it a an inclination to make rash decisions which in turn leads to even more mistakes. Panic is a forerunner of the development of a blame culture which in no time sees the disintegration of the spirit of togetherness and the splitting into fractious groups. Nothing is more likely to heighten the possibility of relegation for a team.

Canary fans have had a crushingly disappointing start to the season. The lack of consistency in performance and the barren period without goals scored from open play has meant that the danger of a panic reaction among supporters could not be ignored.

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The team and management gave us a positive lead on Tuesday night. No panic, but hard work in training, an attacking line up and a carefully planned strategy to beat the league leaders.

The fact still remains that, after the game on Tuesday, Norwich City have only 13 points from 12 games. We have scored 13 goals and let in 15, six of which have been penalties.

As the situation stands at the moment the club does not have the finance to simply buy themselves out of trouble, let alone challenge for a place in the play-offs.

It is important that we fans recognise the tremendous contribution made by Delia and Michael to Norwich City Football Club and that without them we would not have a club to support.

However, it is unrealistic to expect that they alone can provide the necessary future funds that NCFC needs to secure consistency and success.

The arguments and debate that has followed the extensive use of loan players at the club are interesting but will never be conclusive. We can all name good and bad loan signings. The real point is that the extended use of loan players is an indication of the increasingly difficult financial position that clubs find themselves in. Debt cannot just keep rising year on year.

The difficulty is finding new money which does not come with a ticking time bomb of a financier who is looking for an investment which will suck a football club dry. This is a real prospect for some supporters of Premier clubs.

Maybe it is realistic to hope that the directors will find the right investors for the club we love.

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