Linnets sparked a love of football

John Wilkinson, NCISA I WENT to Carrow Road one night last week to watch my other Norfolk football team - King's Lynn. To be more precise it was the reserves playing and winning against Wroxham in the 2009 Norfolk Senior Cup.

John Wilkinson, NCISA

I WENT to Carrow Road one night last week to watch my other Norfolk football team - King's Lynn. To be more precise it was the reserves playing and winning against Wroxham in the 2009 Norfolk Senior Cup.

I've supported the Linnets since my childhood days in the early 1950s when I used to return to Norfolk to holiday each year.

My Uncle Horrie used to take me to The Walks. I remember the team had some useful strikers, one of whom had one leg longer than the other. At that time one Linnet supporter who always stood on the then terrace behind one of the goals used to bellow every few minutes: "Come on the Town".


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It was Uncle Horrie who took me to my first match at Carrow Road. The coaches came from all parts of Norfolk and parked head to tail on Riverside. Carrow Road was packed, with all standing room taken. The crowd ensured that youngsters were ushered to the front of the terracing so that we could see.

It is from such things that a life-long love of football and support of a team begins. Later as a teenager living in London, but without much money, watching Norwich had to be at such places as Charlton or QPR, but the visit of King's Lynn to Brentford in the FA Cup was an occasion not to be missed.

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Such is the strength of loyalty to Norwich City that whatever happens in the final games of this wretched season the fact is that the Canaries will be well supported come August. However, lessons must be learnt from the goings on of the past few years. It appears that it is now realised that success can only be achieved by a management team that understands the passion and feeling of belonging at this club which is the strength of its supporter base. Never again should the team be expected to play without a tall, able target man being available permanently in the squad who can hold the ball to allow others to come into attack. The power of money in football today is almost obscene and clubs such as Norwich have to ensure that a youth system has not only to develop home talent but give young players a chance to learn their trade with the opportunity for first team football. We need regular reserve team football to bring on the youngsters and to enable senior players to return to match fitness after injury.

Successful teams have experienced players but they also nurture those with a hunger to improve and able to learn from good coaching together with a passion to give their all for 90 minutes every game.

We loyal fans have an expectation that the club will make the necessary changes sooner rather than later.

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