Result is not everything

Ian Russell, Capital Canaries Most people I spoke with following the scoreless draw with Leicester last Saturday seemed confounded as to whether they should be happy for the performance or disappointed that we failed to put the ball in the back of net.

Ian Russell, Capital Canaries

Most people I spoke with following the scoreless draw with Leicester last Saturday seemed confounded as to whether they should be happy for the performance or disappointed that we failed to put the ball in the back of net.

I've got to say that I share the same confusion.

I'm not sure how justified the linesman's offside flag was for Crofty's goal (what a good game he had by the way) and we can be forgiven for feeling a little devoid of lady luck's intervention for the two Dion headers that clattered the uprights at either end of the park.


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However, in spite of our domination (particularly in the first half) we didn't create a hatful of chances and, when we did, we drew a blank.

Upon the new manager's arrival, it was obvious to us all that the defence required some shoring up and the midfield was in serious need of new blood.

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Something tells me that a new striker will be top of the Carrow Road shopping list as we enter the last week of the January window.

The re-emergence of King Kev on Tyneside will have the Geordies licking their lips at the thought of a return to attacking, entertaining football and, ultimately, who can blame them.

There's something to be said about intelligent, fast-flowing and high tempo soccer that touches the spot and I believe that, deep down, we all long for it.

Liverpool achieved it in the 80's, the Brazilians do it as a matter of course and (if I dare put City in the same sentence as the former two) our very own Canaries have had their moments of causing the purists to sit up and take notice.

So, what would we prefer?

Well, in an ideal world of course we'd want everything - great football and winning results - but realistically it's usually got to be one or the other.

Would we be happy to settle for the Wimbledon, Bolton or Stoke view of scoring at set pieces and filling the box with six foot plus giants?

Or would we prefer our teams to be striving to keep the ball on the deck, playing with wide men and aiming to beat teams with our brains not brawn?

I think Roeder's an advocate of the latter school and I for one am very pleased about that.

Let's hope for a couple more willing students to enter the doors of Colney this week.

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