Roeder blasts abusive fans

STEVE DOWNES Norwich City boss Glenn Roeder has launched a venomous attack on the “low-life” and “saddoes” who unleash foul-mouthed terrace tirades at managers during matches.

STEVE DOWNES

Norwich City boss Glenn Roeder has launched a venomous attack on the “low-life” and “saddoes” who unleash foul-mouthed terrace tirades at managers during matches.

Roeder's anger boiled over as he revealed that he endured “terrible” abuse when City played at Colchester United's Layer Road on Saturday.

The revelations came after Portsmouth manager Harry Redknapp hit out at the “filth” directed at him by Aston Villa fans during his side's 3-1 win at Villa Park on December 8.


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A few days earlier, many newspapers printed pictures of Newcastle United boss Sam Allardyce being harangued by some of his own supporters sitting behind the St James' Park dug-out.

And in November, Manchester United said they were compiling a dossier after claims that manager Sir Alex Ferguson was verbally abused by Arsenal fans during the 2-2 draw between the sides at the Emirates Stadium.

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Roeder said: “It's terrible. I had it again at Colchester on Saturday. They're real saddoes - low lives. Fortunately I don't have to live my life through people like that. I keep reminding myself that those saddoes pay my wages.

“Harry Redknapp said it was filth. Animals don't behave like that.”

For Roeder, the abuse plumbed new depths in September 2006 when, as manager of Newcastle United, he returned to his former club West Ham United for a Premiership match.

After acknowledging with a wave the chants of the Toon Army support, Roeder was subjected to comments from the Hammers fans, including “tumour boy” and “why are you still alive?”

The shouts related to when Roeder collapsed with a benign brain tumour in 2003, during his time as West Ham boss. The growth was removed and Roeder has made a full recovery.

He said: “I've told myself that it's a good thing I'm still here to hear it. There's an element attracted to football that are no more than sick-minded people. For two hours every Saturday afternoon, at least the local police know where the saddoes are.

“It's not hurtful because I've got no respect for these people. They are sick. Most of them have children, some have grandchildren. They stand there with contorted faces and their children see it.

"It's a disease, a societal disease. It happens wherever you are.”

Redknapp, who was seen to be involved in exchanges with Villa fans in the enclosure behind the Pompey dug-out, said: “You've got people saying stuff behind you with little kids shouting filth. I didn't bring my kids up to talk like that. Do we have to keep standing there and accepting that?”

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